Power Campusing

What is it?

Campusing for power helps you to deliver the most force possible as quickly as possible, helping you with explosive moves when climbing. Power is a fundamental element of, and the base of climbing training. By practicing dynamic moves and speed on the campus board you can improve your power and coordination. The following are just a few of the potential exercises you can perform on the campus board.

How should I program it?

You need to do power exercises at the start of your session when you are still fresh. Putting it before a strength bouldering or anaerobic capacity session can work well. While we recommend that most climbers use the large rungs and balls to increase their power, advanced climbers can use the crimps to specifically improve their finger strength. Under 18s should not campus unsupervised as they are more susceptible to injury due to bad practice or over training.

 
 

Campus Exercises

Each of the following exercises has a range of progression options associated with it. Have a look at the recommended prerequisites of starting each progression and make sure you are comfortable on all the previous versions. You can also progress by increasing the move size.

 

Laddering

Laddering is best for improving one arm strength and coordination (when done quickly). It is the most popular exercise to start on and can help you transition onto the other exercises. It is also the most directly transferrable to climbing.

Climbers of all abilities are generally safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet on.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet off.

  • Crimps with feet on.

If you have been climbing for around 4 years or more and climb at the f7b level you should be safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs and balls with a weight vest.

  • Crimps with feet off.

 

1 Arm Progressions

This is the ultimate campus exercise for building contact strength and 1 arm explosiveness. When working on the balls you will also be working on your mantle strength and technique.

Climbers of all abilities are generally safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet on.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet off.

  • Crimps with feet on.

If you have been climbing for around 4 years or more and climb at the f7b level you should be safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs and balls with a weight vest.

  • Crimps with feet off.

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Double Dyno

Double dynos are the key exercise for pure explosive power whilst also building your contact strength and coordination.

Climbers of all abilities are generally safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet on.

If you have been climbing for around 4 years or more and climb at the f7a level you should be safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet off.

  • Large Rungs and balls with a weight vest.

 

Coordination Dyno

Building your coordination through this exercise will help you to perform dynamic moves quickly and accurately when climbing.

Climbers of all abilities are generally safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet on.

If you have been climbing for around 4 years or more and climb at the f7a level you should be safe to try these progressions.

  • Large Rungs & Balls with feet off.

  • Large Rungs and balls with a weight vest.

 

Your Campus Session

A typical campus session will consist of two or three exercises, each performed twice on two different holds. To work power try to adjust the intensity so you are completing 2-6 moves before failing (if you can complete over 6 reps then the exercise is too easy and you are no longer working on power). Have 2-3 minutes rest in between each of your sets so that you recover fully. The session will last 30 to 45 minutes in total depending on your rest and the intensity.

Form Notes

  • Warm up with the easiest exercises and complete the most dynamic ones in the middle and end of the session.

  • Perform the movements quickly with maximum power.

  • Make sure you have full control of each stage of an exercise before progressing onto a harder movement or smaller hold.

 

 

Coaching and Training at the Foundry

 

More Training Sessions

Aerobic Capacity (Endurance)

 

Strength & Power

 

Anaerobic Capacity (Short Strength Endurance)

 

Aerobic Power (Long Strength Endurance)

 

Conditioning

 

Flexibility and Mobility